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Interviewing for a New Job? Consistency Is Key!

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by Sally Horwood

almost 2 years ago

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Being interviewed by a recruiter is one of the first steps in acquiring a new role. Sometimes, this process can be long and drawn out (as much as we'd like that it weren't!), and ensuring you provide consistent information and answers can be difficult. However, consistency is incredibly important. 

Changing or amending your responses to the same question to your recruiter or the hiring organisation can be the difference between being rejected for the role and getting through to the next stage. 

Whilst this may seem silly, my colleague at people2people did experience this problem. The candidate, who had applied for a customer service role, expressed in his initial interview that he thrived working in a team environment. 

However, at the interview with the hiring manager, he expressed the exact opposite! This ended up being frustrating for all involved and disappointing to the candidate who was subsequently rejected for the position. One of the main reasons this is so important is that recruiters are given a specific job description before beginning the recruitment process. 

The questions we ask during the interview are our way of determining whether you and your background are suitable for the role. It's not just about  prior skills and experience, but also to confirm what you deem to be important in your job search and ensure that it aligns with what the organisation is looking for. If the two way communication process doesn't match,  it inhibits our ability to convince the hiring manager why they should hire you. 

Remaining consistent in your answers in the first interview applies to everything, from salary, to career aspirations, to potential holidays booked. Telling your recruiter the facts enables us to communicate this to an organisation prior to you meeting them, avoiding any surprises.

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