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The Word Is 'No' – Build a Bridge and Get over It

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by Lisa Johnson

over 2 years ago

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I just listened to one of our consultants talking on the telephone with a potential applicant for a vacancy.  The role is a five day a week position paying a reasonable salary.  The applicant said the following: 'Well, I can only work three days a week, and I want more money.' The consultant very nicely, and, by this, I mean professionally and courteously, suggested that this role is not for the candidate.  

The hiring manager required someone for the five days and had no room to move on budget. The job applicant hung up on the consultant. Doing this is bad form.  

It just doesn't pay to be rude to a recruiter.  Your behaviour affects our perception of you as a candidate – if you can be rude to us, perhaps you would be rude to the prospective employer, our client. Perhaps your attitude is reflective of how you handle yourself in the workplace.  It makes it difficult for us to work with you. Always behave professionally.  Even if someone is not telling you what you want to hear, maintain your dignity and your manners.  We know it’s upsetting when something doesn't go your way – we get frustrated when it doesn't go our way too – but throwing your toys out of the cot (so to speak) only makes you look immature and a little unhinged.

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